News and Events

News and Events

E.g., 02/28/2017
E.g., 02/28/2017
February 24, 2017Who uses NASA Earth science data? Katherine Pitts, to study the impacts of climate change and analyze remotely-sensed geophysical data. Visit the EOSDIS EARTHDATA website to read more about Katherine's use of NASA Earth Science data in her career as a Engineering Scientist Associate in the Applied Research Laboratories at the University of Texas at Austin.
January 4, 2017Forest Flyer, a newsletter issued by the U.S. Forest Service International Programs – Asia and Pacific Region, recently featured SERVIR-Mekong’s Regional Land Cover Monitoring System (RLCMS). With high demands on limited land resources in the Lower Mekong region, officials in charge of land use planning need accurate, high-quality land cover and land use maps. The U.S. Forest Service is supporting development of SERVIR-Mekong’s RLCMS, which will produce such maps, enabling more efficient and effective mapping for improved policy formulation and decision making.
January 4, 2017On December 14, 2016, NASA Marshall Space Flight Center’s Dan Irwin received the Rotary Humanitarian STAR Award. The Rotary Club of Sierra Madre bestowed the honor upon Irwin for developing the SERVIR program.
December 7, 2016Meet Lauren Childs-Gleason, who combined her love of geography with her love of program coordination to find her niche at NASA. Lauren is the national operations lead for DEVELOP, part of the NASA Applied Sciences' Capacity Building Program, which seeks to address environmental and public policy issues through interdisciplinary research projects that apply the lens of NASA Earth observations to community concerns around the globe.
December 7, 2016Two DEVELOP participants, Allison Daniel (DEVELOP MSFC) and Dr. Sara Lubkin (DEVELOP GSFC) were two of five grand prize winners in the 2016 AGU Data Visualization Storytelling Competition. They took their DEVELOP projects and crafted a “story” for the competition. They won over $6,000 worth of travel funding and will be presenting their “stories” on the Hyperwall in the NASA booth during the AGU Fall Meeting. Congratulations Allison and Sara!
December 7, 2016From 24-28 October 2016, SERVIR team members from around the globe met in Pokhara, Nepal for the 2nd SERVIR Annual Global Exchange. The event drew close to 100 participants including representatives from SERVIR hubs in Niger, Kenya, Nepal and Thailand; the SERVIR Science Coordination Office in Huntsville, Alabama; NASA HQ and USAID HQ in Washington, D.C.; and the SERVIR Applied Sciences Team, with members from across the U.S. During this week-long exchange, attendees shared best practices and discussed current GIS-related technical innovations, service planning, communications and knowledge management. The week ended with sessions focused on developing and refining long-term strategic plans for SERVIR’s continued growth. Dan Irwin of the SERVIR Science Coordination Office best summarized this exchange by stating, “It was the rich conversations that made this week such a success.”
October 31, 2016This story in NASA EARTH OBSERVATORY from 9 August 2016 highlights the work of Conservation International (Karyn Tabor, PI) towards improving access to Earth observation data for improving wildfire management practices in numerous under served nations of the world. The wildfire geospatial visualization and management package, called Firecast is a system to monitor and deliver alerts for active fires, fire risk, and deforestation in the tropics. The project’s web site (http://firecast.conservation.org/) and mobile application bring NASA satellite data to fire managers in areas that have traditionally relied on ground-based monitoring. Users can view maps of active fires, download daily fire risk forecasts, read reports of local fire activity, and see current activity in context with historical data.
October 12, 2016Louisiana’s coastal wetland habitats are imperiled by several natural and anthropogenic phenomena, including the extreme effects of climate change. They’re home to 40 percent of the nation’s wetlands and account for 80 percent of the annual wetland loss, prompting scientists to project they’ll completely disappear in the next 200 years. “It’s a really big deal right now because Louisiana is losing so much land,” according to Mark Barker, communications fellow for NASA’s DEVELOP Program, part of the agency’s Applied Sciences Program. The program takes a multidisciplinary research approach to bridge the gap between science and society.
October 12, 2016It all began with a single, pregnant mite. Within a few years, thousands of acres of bright green forests would yellow and wither. From its home in the Eastern Hemisphere, the mite crossed the Atlantic Ocean by ship or winds and made landfall in Martinique. The journey likely occurred sometime in 2003. Within a few years, that mite and its offspring reproduced to create a tiny, gnawing army that felled trees on multiple Caribbean islands. By 2006, the ravenous mites had reached Puerto Rico, where they chewed through coconut palms, bananas, and plantains along the coast. DNA tests show that all of those insects can trace their lineage back to that one mite. It’s not a myth or a horror story. It’s a series of events and circumstances that prompted research by a group of NASA-funded researchers. “We were trying to determine what a palm mite infestation looks like from space, and we didn’t have any previous data,“ said Sara Lubkin, the project lead and a professor at the University of Mary Washington. Working together with the U.S. Department of Agriculture and the University of Puerto Rico, Lubkin and her team tracked the mite’s spread across Puerto Rico by mapping changes to vegetation (such as yellowing) and differences in canopy structure. By counting the number of pixels of affected palms, the researchers were able to get a sense of the scale of the problem in Puerto Rico. The work was funded through NASA’s DEVELOP program, which “addresses environmental and public policy issues” using Earth observations.
October 12, 2016ADPC hosted the Power, vulnerability and agency in disaster risk reduction: A knowledge exchange for sustainable development in Asia from 20–21 September in Bangkok. The learning exchange brought together disaster management, women/social affairs departments, women’s groups, and geographic information system (GIS) experts to promote better linkages and synergies between disaster risk reduction and gender initiatives to promote sustainable development. The event also aimed to create national communities of practice encouraging stakeholders to work together for Gender and GIS synergy in the future, such as by using gender-disaggregated data to identify vulnerable populations within a community.