Date

Summary

Date: Sept. 19, 2021
Type:  Volcanoes
RegionAfrica, Canary Islands
Info & Resources: 

 


UPDATE Oct. 13, 2021

View fullscreen on the NASA Disasters Mapping Portal

Researchers working with the NASA ROSES A.37 project “Day-Night Monitoring of Volcanic SO2 and Ash for Aviation Avoidance at Northern Polar Latitudes” developed this animation of sulfur dioxide (SO2) clouds from the La Palma eruption using satellite data from NASA / NOAA Suomi-NPP and NOAA-20 Ozone Mapping and Profiler Suite (OMPS) spectrometers. Both satellites fly similar near-polar orbits, but are about 50 minutes apart. NOAA-20 OMPS measures with higher ground resolution. Using two satellites allows researchers to make more frequent, precise observations to identify hazardous densities of volcanic gases and aerosols.  

The above animation shows SO2 column density in Dobson Units (1 DU = 2.69 x 1016 SO2 molecules /cm2) from Sept. 19 – 30, 2021. S02 is used to indicate the presence of volcanic gases and also as a proxy for volcanic aerosols (sulfuric acid or vog and ash), which can negatively affect air quality for people living in the region, as well as potentially damage aircraft flying through the volcanic clouds. Credits: NASA
 

Update Oct. 4, 2021

Infrared satellite observations from the Landsat 8 Operational Land Imager (OLI) reveal the hottest parts of the lava flow on Sept. 26, 2021. Credits: NASA Earth Observatory images by Lauren Dauphin, using Landsat data from the U.S. Geological Survey
Infrared satellite observations from the Landsat 8 Operational Land Imager (OLI) reveal the hottest parts of the lava flow on Sept. 26, 2021. Credits: NASA Earth Observatory images by Lauren Dauphin, using Landsat data from the U.S. Geological Survey

On Sept. 19, 2021, the Cumbre Vieja volcano on the island of La Palma in the Canary Islands started erupting after remaining dormant for 50 years. Since the initial eruption, the volcano has seen several Strombolian explosions, significant emissions of ash and gas, and multiple vents spewing molten lava down the mountain and into surrounding regions. According to the latest media reports over 800 buildings have been destroyed and about 6,000 people evacuated from the area.

The NASA Earth Applied Sciences Disasters program area has activated efforts to monitor the eruption and provide Earth-observing data and analysis in support of risk reduction and recovery for the eruption. The program is in contact with colleagues from the Instituto Geologico y Minero de Espana (IGME) and the Institut de Physique du Globe de Paris (IPGP) to share knowledge and data for situational awareness. 

These efforts are being supported by the NASA ROSES A.37 research projects “Day-Night Monitoring of Volcanic SO2 and Ash for Aviation Avoidance at Northern Polar Latitudes” and “Global Rapid Damage Mapping System with Spaceborne SAR Data.”

The Advanced Rapid Imaging and Analysis (ARIA) team at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory and California Institute of Technology in Southern California produced these Damage Proxy Maps (DPM) depicting areas likely damaged or impacted by ash fall from the volcanic eruption on the island of La Palma. The image shows two DPMs produced with data from Sept. 20 and 22, 2021. Each pixel of damage detection measures about 98 feet (30 meters) across, with yellow pixels indicating likely moderately damaged areas and re
The Advanced Rapid Imaging and Analysis (ARIA) team at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory and California Institute of Technology in Southern California produced these Damage Proxy Maps (DPM) depicting areas likely damaged or impacted by ash fall from the volcanic eruption on the island of La Palma. The image shows two DPMs produced with data from Sept. 20 and 22, 2021. Each pixel of damage or ash detection measures about 98 feet (30 meters) across, with yellow pixels indicating likely moderately damaged  areas, and red indicating likely severely damaged or ash-covered areas. Credits: ARIA / NASA JPL. Copyright contains modified Copernicus Sentinel data (2021) processed by the ESA.
This displacement map, generated using ESA Sentinel-1 Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) data collected on Sept. 16 and 22, 2021, shows the movement of the land due to the eruption. Blue shades indicate movement away from the satellite and red shades indicate movement toward the satellite. Credits: NASA / JPL-Caltech. Copyright contains modified Copernicus Sentinel data (2021) processed by the ESA.
This displacement map, generated using ESA Sentinel-1 Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) data collected on Sept. 16 and 22, 2021, shows the movement of the land due to the eruption. The arrow shows the radar satellite track and the radar is looking to the side of the track. Blue shades indicate movement away from the satellite and red shades indicate movement towards the satellite (up or east). The red area is mostly land uplifted by the magma moving closer to the surface of the volcano before the eruption. Credits: NASA / JPL-Caltech. Copyright contains modified Copernicus Sentinel data (2021) processed by the ESA.