• Wildfire DSS Enhancements: Integrating Real-Time Orbital and Suborbital Assets for Pre-, Active-, and Post-Fire Assessments
Program Disasters Program
PI / Institution Vincent G. Ambrosia / California State University - Monterey Bay
Start Date January 1, 2009
End Date April 1, 2009
  • Summary

    The wildland fire management agencies employ three disparate Decision Support Systems: pre-fire, active-fire, and post-fire DSSs. We propose to improve the nation's response to and management of wildland fires by integrating the three DSS's, using NASA research results (data and models) combined with NASA IT collaborative decision expertise. We will provide a NASA Collaborative Decision Environment (CDE), composed of a shareable and extensible COTS data visualization capability, for effective, rapid, decision data / model integration. We will rely on a standing committee of managers, scientists and geo-spatial specialists from the wildland fire agencies, NASA and academia to develop DSS gap analysis assessments, design solutions, evaluate, and infuse the capabilities we demonstrate in this proposal. We will integrate the CDE and the NASA model and data during wildland fire events in the US, working with the National Interagency Fire Center and individual wildland fire Incident Command Teams. This effort is a unification of three proposals, designed to cohesively unite the capabilities of three DSSs into one system to facilitate the use of cross-solution tool sets. We have developed a team uniquely qualified to fulfill all the objectives of this proposed effort. The NASA-ARC team has a long heritage with active-fire observations and a matching long heritage with collaborative applications efforts with the USFS. Our proposal partner, the University of Maryland has a long heritage in active fire mapping, pre-/post-fire analysis, and a matching long heritage with collaborative applications efforts with the USFS. The Collaborative Decision Environment team (NASA-ARC), has a strong heritage in development of tools and capabilities to share and simplify data visualization; they also have a 5-year heritage working on wildland fire data integrations for USFS customers. Rather than proposing independently, we have combined our efforts herein to unify the tools and data of the wildland fire management community into a single effort. The strong collaborative heritage of the partners will ensure successful implementation of the integrated system solutions we propose in this effort. This proposal is responsive to the Disaster Management element of NASA¿s Applied Sciences program, and responds to the Decision Support Through Earth Science Research Results (Appendix A.20) call of NASA ROSES 2007.